Don’t Miss: Mudhoney @ Black Cat, 7/7/15

Mudhoney Mudhoney (Photo courtesy Sub Pop Records)

Mudhoney, one of the early bands in the Seattle grunge scene, is performing tonight at the Black Cat, July 7, 2015.

Formed in 1988, Mudhoney contributed to the movement that became the grunge sound in the early 1990’s.

Mudhoney started their career with the Sub Pop record label, then branched off to a major label for the better part of a decade, before finally returning to Sup Pop in 2000, where they have released their last four albums.

With nine studio albums under their belt, the most recent being the 2013 release, Vanishing Point, they have been actively producing their distinct mix of grunge, punk and blues rock for almost 30 years.

Indeed, Mark Arm, lead singer of Mudhoney, is credited with using the term “grunge” in 1981 as a description of the sound of his first band. It was later used as the moniker of the whole sub genre of alternative music coming out of Seattle.

I grew up near Seattle, and become a huge fan of seminal grunge bands like Soundgarden, Pearl Jam and Nirvana. I largely missed out on Mudhoney during the first half of the 1990’s, but have come back to them over the last few years.

Let’s see what I missed.

Kid Congo Powers and Pink Monkey Birds open. Tickets are available online and at the door.

Mudhoney
w/ Kid Congo Powers and Pink Monkey Birds
Black Cat
Tuesday, July 7
Doors @7:30pm
$16
All ages

Music Park: Royal Blood @ 9:30 Club — 6/10/15

royalblood
Mike Kerr of Royal Blood at the 9:30 Club on June 10 (Photo by Katerine Gaines/AmbientEye Photography)

Royal Blood are loud. Improbably so, considering it consists of only two members — bassist Mike Kerr and drummer Ben Thatcher.

Mike’s vocals recall the spirit of 70s hard rock bands that inspired them, most notably Led Zeppelin, and Mike and Ben’s powerful instruments echo sounds from 90s grunge bands, notably Nirvana.

I realize that I’m repeating things that Jimmy Page and Dave Grohl themselves have said here, but the duo’s top song “Out of the Black” speaks its own case in volumes. At a sold-out show at the 9:30 Club on Wednesday, June 10, Royal Blood closed an all too brief 11-song set with the number, thundering their way into the hearts of the excited crowd.

People came to rock out, and Royal Blood gave them that opportunity. “Out of the Black” deals lyrically with a classic theme of the surprise of being rejected by a lover and as a result, “It broke your skin and shook through/Every part of me, every part of you.” In that way, Royal Blood follow in the footsteps of grunge bands who were always eager to sing about the negative emotions in their lives.

But Royal Blood aren’t here to wind down their statements into an empty cacophony of strings and drums. Rather, they are here to rock.

Continue Reading